Child education Bill on second review in Yei

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Civil society organizations in Yei River County are reviewing the municipal Child Education Bill 2014 for the second time to realize the provision of sustainable and quality educational services.

The draft Bill was given to the civil society organizations by the municipal legislative council two weeks ago to enable them add their input.

Dara Felix, the forum’s secretary general said they are collectively carrying out review, analysis and adding input on the draft Bill, which aims at creating an inclusive, quality and sustainable learning environment.

Dara says the Bill will help parents, education officials and the local authority in addressing issues of school dropout and other education issues affecting children.

“We are trying to analyze our ideas and see how our ideas can best be fitted in that document so that it becomes an inclusive, collective document made by the people of Yei municipality,” Dara told TCT.

“The purpose of this document is to create an inclusive, quality and sustainable learning environment,” he added.

He said the assessment they carried out in 2014 revealed 608 pupils out of 3,719 pupils dropped out of school in the whole county, including the municipality.

The activist called for team work towards reduction in maternal mortality rate, poverty level, infant morality rate and to see increase in children’s enrolment in schools.

“So something has to come out that can address this issue,” he said.

Community Empowerment for Rehabilitation and Development (CEFoRD) programme manager Mawa George Lazarus said it was the first time that the council had given the civil society organizations a chance to get their views on law making.

“This is the first kind here in Yei, and that to me gives credit to them. It is important that when you come up with laws it has to be consultative,” he said.

The County and municipality have in total 120 primary, 64 nursery and 20 secondary schools with a high number of pupils and students. This is according to the acting education director, Reverend Philip Taban Isa. 

He attributed poor performance to delayed and irregular payment of school fees and influx of people from other conflict areas to the few available schools, leading to congestion in classes.

“If we go to the school, a class is having about 200 pupils. Will the teacher really concentrate? But the law says don’t stop a child from accessing school. We the parents are sometimes to blame for the failure of the children because what is needed for the child at school is not given,” Rev. Taban said.

Civil society organizations in Yei River County are reviewing the municipal Child Education Bill 2014 for the second time to realize the provision of sustainable and quality educational services.

The draft Bill was given to the civil society organizations by the municipal legislative council two weeks ago to enable them add their input.

Dara Felix, the forum’s secretary general said they are collectively carrying out review, analysis and adding input on the draft Bill, which aims at creating an inclusive, quality and sustainable learning environment.

Dara says the Bill will help parents, education officials and the local authority in addressing issues of school dropout and other education issues affecting children.

“We are trying to analyze our ideas and see how our ideas can best be fitted in that document so that it becomes an inclusive, collective document made by the people of Yei municipality,” Dara told TCT.

“The purpose of this document is to create an inclusive, quality and sustainable learning environment,” he added.

He said the assessment they carried out in 2014 revealed 608 pupils out of 3,719 pupils dropped out of school in the whole county, including the municipality.

The activist called for team work towards reduction in maternal mortality rate, poverty level, infant morality rate and to see increase in children’s enrolment in schools.

“So something has to come out that can address this issue,” he said.

Community Empowerment for Rehabilitation and Development (CEFoRD) programme manager Mawa George Lazarus said it was the first time that the council had given the civil society organizations a chance to get their views on law making.

“This is the first kind here in Yei, and that to me gives credit to them. It is important that when you come up with laws it has to be consultative,” he said.

The County and municipality have in total 120 primary, 64 nursery and 20 secondary schools with a high number of pupils and students. This is according to the acting education director, Reverend Philip Taban Isa. 

He attributed poor performance to delayed and irregular payment of school fees and influx of people from other conflict areas to the few available schools, leading to congestion in classes.

“If we go to the school, a class is having about 200 pupils. Will the teacher really concentrate? But the law says don’t stop a child from accessing school. We the parents are sometimes to blame for the failure of the children because what is needed for the child at school is not given,” Rev. Taban said.

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