Government assesses state of development in Tore Payam

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A committee formed by the governor of Central Equatoria state Clement Wani Konga has assessed the state of development in Tore Payam of Yei River County in order to improve the quality of services rendered to citizens.

The state director general in the ministry of Physical Infrastructure John Bullen Lako said they assessed many sectors in the payam including education, health, water, roads and bridges.

He said the assessment seeks to enable the state government to plan for service delivery to the people of Tore. Mr. Bullen said the ministry will send surveyors and engineers to the payam to implement the demarcation master plan.

He said that the delegation tried to collect information on as many problems as possible and to forward the report back to the governor. Many local residents decried the poor state of educational facilities in the payam.

“For sure these problems can be addressed,” Bullen said. “The school environment in Tore is not good, no classes, no shelter and a lot of things.”

Tore payam, one of the five payams of Yei River County including the municipality, is located 48 miles North West of Yei town, bordering Western Equatoria state and Democratic Republic of Congo. It is the biggest payam in the county but due to its location, services hardly reach the citizens.

Azaria Khemis Noah, the payam director lamented that poor school structures compel pupils and students to attend classes for half a day during the rainy season.

“There is no shelter. When it comes to rainy season, they are unable to complete their lessons. And when it comes to the dry season it is open and the sun is very hot, so they are unable to go on,” he said during a meeting with the state delegation.

He said the school officials and pupils struggle to pass though there is a lack of materials and teachers. Local education officials said the payam has eleven primary schools and one secondary.

A resident Fr Lazarus Mondua told state delegates to report their assessment to the government so that the government can improve the quality of education in the payam.

“If someone comes to Tore and talks about education, it is really shameful. You will find many children are under trees. Which is a big problem,” he said.

Civil society and community based organizations earlier on reported that boreholes constructed by state funds were put in places with low populations, with others being unfunctional.

The residents complained that up to June, the roads would be blocked and farmers would have no way of transporting their produce to markets.

A committee formed by the governor of Central Equatoria state Clement Wani Konga has assessed the state of development in Tore Payam of Yei River County in order to improve the quality of services rendered to citizens.

The state director general in the ministry of Physical Infrastructure John Bullen Lako said they assessed many sectors in the payam including education, health, water, roads and bridges.

He said the assessment seeks to enable the state government to plan for service delivery to the people of Tore. Mr. Bullen said the ministry will send surveyors and engineers to the payam to implement the demarcation master plan.

He said that the delegation tried to collect information on as many problems as possible and to forward the report back to the governor. Many local residents decried the poor state of educational facilities in the payam.

“For sure these problems can be addressed,” Bullen said. “The school environment in Tore is not good, no classes, no shelter and a lot of things.”

Tore payam, one of the five payams of Yei River County including the municipality, is located 48 miles North West of Yei town, bordering Western Equatoria state and Democratic Republic of Congo. It is the biggest payam in the county but due to its location, services hardly reach the citizens.

Azaria Khemis Noah, the payam director lamented that poor school structures compel pupils and students to attend classes for half a day during the rainy season.

“There is no shelter. When it comes to rainy season, they are unable to complete their lessons. And when it comes to the dry season it is open and the sun is very hot, so they are unable to go on,” he said during a meeting with the state delegation.

He said the school officials and pupils struggle to pass though there is a lack of materials and teachers. Local education officials said the payam has eleven primary schools and one secondary.

A resident Fr Lazarus Mondua told state delegates to report their assessment to the government so that the government can improve the quality of education in the payam.

“If someone comes to Tore and talks about education, it is really shameful. You will find many children are under trees. Which is a big problem,” he said.

Civil society and community based organizations earlier on reported that boreholes constructed by state funds were put in places with low populations, with others being unfunctional.

The residents complained that up to June, the roads would be blocked and farmers would have no way of transporting their produce to markets.

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