Government condemns killing of aid worker

Ateny Wek Ateny, the government spokesman. He condemned the killing and promised that the government would carry out thorough investigations to find the killers of the slain aid worker.
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The government of South Sudan has condemned the killing of an aid worker in the capital, Juba, on Tuesday night.

Reports say that the British aid worker who works for the Carter Centre was shot dead on Tuesday night after being approached by a gunman as he entered his compound.

Ateny Wek Ateny, an official spokesman, said the assailant walked into the guarded compound, where the Carter Centre is based, at around 8.30pm and opened fire with an AK-47.

“He got out of the car, then while walking he was shot,” said Mr Ateny, according to Agence France-Presse news agency.

The government condemned the crime “in the strongest terms possible” and an investigation would take place, Mr Ateny said.

The death has sparked deep concern in Juba’s large expatriate community, which is facing growing criticism from government and an increase in violent crime.

Meanwhile, Community Empowerment for Progress Organization (CEPO) has condemned the killing.

“CEPO treats the act of the killing the British aid worker as act of person(s) that are enemies of peace and criminal-minded,” it said in a statement.

Mr. Edmund Yakani, Executive Director of CEPO said targeting aid workers is absolutely unacceptable and it is violation of the international humanitarian law. He said the recent increase in targeting humanitarian workers by armed men is an indicator of threat towardshumanitarian work, including increase in road blocks that result to harassment and intimidation of humanitarian aid workers.

“These acts should be stopped and the perpetrators should be identified and held accountable by the government,” he said.

Non-governmental organisations have complained of increased harassment and threats of expulsion by the government, which has in turn accused them of stirring up the civil war.

Last year, the government accused the UN of deliberately concealing rebels inside refugee camps and allowing them to amass weapons.

The United Nations Mission in South Sudan was forced to come out and issue a denial, saying that all those who took refuge in the camps were from all sides in the conflict, and were always disarmed before they are allowed inside the protection of civilian sites.

The government of South Sudan has condemned the killing of an aid worker in the capital, Juba, on Tuesday night.

Reports say that the British aid worker who works for the Carter Centre was shot dead on Tuesday night after being approached by a gunman as he entered his compound.

Ateny Wek Ateny, an official spokesman, said the assailant walked into the guarded compound, where the Carter Centre is based, at around 8.30pm and opened fire with an AK-47.

“He got out of the car, then while walking he was shot,” said Mr Ateny, according to Agence France-Presse news agency.

The government condemned the crime “in the strongest terms possible” and an investigation would take place, Mr Ateny said.

The death has sparked deep concern in Juba’s large expatriate community, which is facing growing criticism from government and an increase in violent crime.

Meanwhile, Community Empowerment for Progress Organization (CEPO) has condemned the killing.

“CEPO treats the act of the killing the British aid worker as act of person(s) that are enemies of peace and criminal-minded,” it said in a statement.

Mr. Edmund Yakani, Executive Director of CEPO said targeting aid workers is absolutely unacceptable and it is violation of the international humanitarian law. He said the recent increase in targeting humanitarian workers by armed men is an indicator of threat towardshumanitarian work, including increase in road blocks that result to harassment and intimidation of humanitarian aid workers.

“These acts should be stopped and the perpetrators should be identified and held accountable by the government,” he said.

Non-governmental organisations have complained of increased harassment and threats of expulsion by the government, which has in turn accused them of stirring up the civil war.

Last year, the government accused the UN of deliberately concealing rebels inside refugee camps and allowing them to amass weapons.

The United Nations Mission in South Sudan was forced to come out and issue a denial, saying that all those who took refuge in the camps were from all sides in the conflict, and were always disarmed before they are allowed inside the protection of civilian sites.

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