South Sudanese are tired of war, they are demanding for peace, now!

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The donkey is known as the beast. As the beast of burden, it is expected to carry heavy loads without complaining, no matter what cruelty the owner metes on it. However, there are times when the donkey can no longer bear cruel treatment by its owner. When such happens, the donkey is known to throw down its burden and turn against its owner in anger. This is what is about to happen in South Sudan now.

The donkey is known as the beast. As the beast of burden, it is expected to carry heavy loads without complaining, no matter what cruelty the owner metes on it. However, there are times when the donkey can no longer bear cruel treatment by its owner. When such happens, the donkey is known to throw down its burden and turn against its owner in anger. This is what is about to happen in South Sudan now.

Early this month, a group of South Sudan activists launched a peace campaign dubbed ‘Anataban!’, an Arabic word which means “we are tired”.

Anataban is a campaign started by a group of young South Sudanese creatives who are tired of seeing their people suffer. The launch that was done in Nairobi featured a collaborative musical piece and music video.

The launch of this campaign comes in the wake of another event by South Sudanese youth, where they marched to the embassy of South Sudan in Nairobi, in support of peace for their country.
On Saturday, 9 July 2016, South Sudan Peace Coalition (PECOSS), a consortium of 30 indigneous but displaced and exiled civil society organizations, community leaders, faith-based groups and student associations based in Nairobi petitioned the UN, AU, IGAD, UNMISS, JMEC (Joint Monitoring and Evaluation Commission) and all diplomatic missions in South Sudan with regard to the looming crisis in South Sudan.
On the occasion of the signing of the peace accord on 17 August, Amnesty International issued a statement calling for accountability for the horrendous crimes committed against women and children, in pursuit of justice for those who have been affected by violence in South Sudan.
During and after the recent fighting between government and opposition armed forces, it was reported that civilians were once again targets of killings, rapes and other forms of sexual violence, and their property was looted and destroyed.
The UN High Commissioner for Human Rights recently urged the government to concentrate on justice and accountability instead of clamping down on journalists. He expressed doubt about the government’s commitment to bring to book perpetrators of violence and abusers of human rights.
It is worth noting that the UN Security Council has called for the deployment of a 4,000-strong protection force in South Sudan’s capital of Juba, as part of the UN peacekeeping mission. The UN has threatened an arms embargo if the government does not cooperate.
All these activities and events by both South Sudanese and foreigners might seem unrelated but they all point out to the need for urgent measures to be taken to restore peace and order in South Sudan. These actions should be enough reason for the main players in the South Sudan conflict to find a lasting solution to the instability and uncertainty that currently engulfs the country.
These initiatives and activities are a sign of a world community that is getting impatient with the protagonists in the war in South Sudan. At the same times, the South Sudanese too are tired of the war and are expressing their anger through various activities. Many of them are asking for peace from their leaders.
That is what is happening through the various statements and activities that are being sent out. When the youth of South Sudan say that they are tired, it is a representation of what many people are feeling in South Sudan.
It is time the main actors provided a viable way of getting out of the stalemate that currently faces the country. As some South Sudanese have rightly said, is it asking for too much from leaders for them to give peace a chance?
South Sudanese are demanding for peace, now, not tomorrow!

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